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PUFF

Canadian Scientists May Have Just Unlocked The Secrets Of Marijuana’s Pain-Relief Potential

BY Puff Staff

Researchers have uncovered how marijuana plants produce pain-killing molecules that are 30 times stronger than aspirin — a property that gives them medicinal promise as a substitute for opioid pain relievers, which can lead to crippling addiction, researchers said.

“There’s clearly a need to develop alternatives for relief of acute and chronic pain that go beyond opioids,” said Tariq Akhtar, a University of Guelph biology professor and author of the study, in a statement on the newly released research.

Those pain-relieving molecules in cannabis, called cannflavin A and cannflavin B, cut down on pain by fighting off inflammation but are not psychoactive, in contrast with the chemicals that give marijuana its mind-bending effects, Canadian researchers said in a Tuesday news release on their findings. The study appears in the August edition of the journal Phytochemistry.

Even though the molecules’ properties have been known for decades, it wasn’t until now that researchers actually mined the genome of a cannabis strain to determine just how the plant’s genes create those two so-called “flavanoid” molecules — both of them found in only trace amounts in the plants, researchers said.

Opioids relieve pain by blocking pain signals in the brain, whereas a cannabis-based alternative relying on the cannflavin molecules would target inflammation itself, researchers said.

But creating a medicine isn’t without its obstacles.

“The problem with these molecules is they are present in cannabis at such low levels, it’s not feasible to try to engineer the cannabis plant to create more of these substances,” Rothstein said.

But now that the gene processes that create the chemicals have been identified, Rothstein said they’re “working to develop a biological system to create these molecules, which would give us the opportunity to engineer large quantities.”

To that end, Guelph researchers have teamed up with Anahit International, a Toronto-based pharmaceutical company, to create “effective and safe anti-inflammatory medicines from cannabis phytochemicals,” the company’s chief operating officer, Darren Carrigan, said in a statement released by the school.

It’s not just opioids that a cannabis-based painkiller might have the edge over — a natural alternative could also have advantages over ibuprofen with its kidney risks, or acetaminophen with its associated liver problems, the Star reported.

“What’s interesting about the molecules in cannabis is that they actually stop inflammation at the source,” Akhtar said, according to the Star. “And most natural products don’t have the toxicity that’s associated with over-the-counter pain relief drugs, which, even though they’re very effective, do come with health risks. So, looking at natural products as an alternative is a very attractive model.”

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